Miscellaneous (Mommy)Blogging Quotes

Just some quotes from posts I had bookmarked, which may or may not be useful.

Shirley Jackson might have been a part-time mommy-blogger, had she lived in the internet age. … Life Among the Savages, a memoir of her life raising three small children in Vermont … is a direct ancestor of the current crop of mothering memoirs — someone should put together a history of the genre — and it shares their frequently jokey “if I didn’t laugh, I’d cry” tone, a tone so different from that used in “The Lottery” that I had to check to make sure this was the same Shirley Jackson. The beginning sucked me in completely[.]

Stephany Aulenback

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The real problem, of course, the real reason why I’m not “squeeing” over BlogHer (ugh, what a word, squee), is that these aren’t really the blogs I read. … BlogHer is a meetup for a particular set of blogging communities, and that’s why people bond and hug and clap and get so emotional. The problem for me is that I read geek blogs and copyright blogs and academic blogs and some politics blogs and some crafts blogs, and those bloggers aren’t at this conference. This conference is for a fairly specific slice of the blogosphere, and I guess it’s not really the slice that I feel at home in.

Jill Walker Rettberg

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While the first BlogHer conference, in 2005, seemed to be about empowering women bloggers, today, empowerment appears to be about “look how powerful we are, corporations take us seriously and want to give us free swag!” But of course, if blogging becomes mainly about accepting free swag and loving the corporations, well, that’s not empowerment, that’s more like oppression – a slightly more subtle form of oppression, perhaps, maybe willing oppression. It doesn’t bode well for the power of blogging to actually spread the voices of the people, though, if the people are happy to speak for the corporations.

Jill Walker Rettberg

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Honesty – how truthful do you want to be in your blog? There are plenty of examples of fictional blogs that have presented themselves as real. When readers discovered they were fictional, they felt cheated and became very angry (I’ve blogged about why readers get angry at this. On a smaller scale, most bloggers leave out the ugly bits and maybe play up the good stuff, as in the quote from Lars Tangen in this blog post. I’m not saying you need to be utterly honest (in fact, the more literary blogs get, the less factual truth matters, in my opinion, but you do need to think about this.

Jill Walker Rettberg

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Dooce.com is now the full time job of both Heather and her husband, Jon. The blog supports an online community and a merchandise store. Heather is the author of a bestselling book, was named by Forbes as one of the 30 most influential women in media in 2009, and just signed an exclusive development deal with HGTV.

In a recent post entitled “Check Up for Self Delusion,” Penelope Trunk, another popular female blogger, recently wrote, “Probably the most accurate representation of women is in the blogosphere. There is no filter here, no need to appeal to both Peoria and Pasadena all at once.” She goes on to compare Dooce.com with an even more popular mommy blog, The Pioneer Woman.

Alaina Smith

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Probably the most accurate representation of women is in the blogosphere. There is no filter here, no need to appeal to both Peoria and Pasadena all at once. But even the whole of the blogosphere does not represent the female experience particularly accurately.

The Pioneer Woman is largely housewife porn. The men are hot and rugged, just like in a romance novel. The author, Ree Drummond, is running an operation similar to Rachel Ray or Martha Stewart, but she markets herself as a stay-at-home mom, and a homeschooler at that. The whole thing strikes me as totally preposterous. … On Dooce, Heather Armstrong blogs about depression, her kids being difficult, and her parents being Mormon. I love Heather Armstrong. But she’s the gold standard for writing a blog about your life and keeping a marriage together, and she is not, actually, writing about the female experience for married women.

Penelope Trunk

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4 thoughts on “Miscellaneous (Mommy)Blogging Quotes

  1. Capital Mom

    Hi, I came over from your comment today on Dani’s blog.

    Just wanted to add a comment about BlogHer. I am going this year for the first time. A bit nervous, not sure what to expect but still excited. I don’t have a blog that makes money/ sells products, which I know will be well represented at BlogHer, but I still think I will get a lot out of it. I am excited about the writing stream they have added this year. There are also some interesting blogger run sessions that have been proposed, like one on Canadian bloggers and another on having a small blog. I have also talked to other bloggers that have attended and some called out the cliques but others said that it is an opportunity to find like minded bloggers.

    The BlogHer site also has some interesting discussion you might be interested in on jealousy and obligations for bigger bloggers to help smaller ones.
    http://www.blogher.com/are-bigger-bloggers-obligated-help-smaller-bloggers
    http://www.blogher.com/hey-jealousy-blogigng-kind-course?from=nethed

    I really want to go to BlogHer to learn. I may be a “mommyblogger” but that doesn’t mean I don’t want to learn how to be better at it.

    Thanks!

    1. Theryn Post author

      Glad you liked 🙂

      I doubt you’re the only one who doesn’t care–after all, some people don’t even know that there are women who blog 😉 haha!

      Speaking of the #xxbloggers thing, it reminded me that a lot of people (including some bloggers) still haven’t realized the blogosphere is not really one big sphere where everybody knows everyone else, but rather a bunch of smaller spheres, some of which overlap. So you have people who are totally famous within their blogcircle, but other bloggers have never heard of them.

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